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  1. #11
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    Default Coronavirus Hits S.D. - State confirms five cases, including one death

    Coronavirus Hits S.D. - State confirms five cases, including one death

    By Casey Junkins casey.junkins@capjournal.com and Del Bartels del.bartels@capjournal.com
    Mar 10, 2020 Updated Mar 11, 2020



    https://www.capjournal.com/news/coro...27b91ee67.html
    http://christian-identity.net/forum/...1061#post21061
    http://whitenationalist.org/forum/sh...1061#post21061


    The coronavirus has made its way to South Dakota, as Gov. Kristi Noem said late Tuesday there are five cases in as many counties throughout the state — with one of those contributing to a death.

    A man in the 60-69 age range Pennington County who reportedly had underlying medical conditions is dead.

    The others affected a 30-39 age female in Davison County, a 40-49 male in Beadle County, a 40-49 male in Minnehaha County, and a 50-59 male in Charles Mix County. All are staying in their homes during their recoveries, according to Noem.

    Noem said Department of Health officials are working to determine and locate individuals who have been in close contact with these five.

    “All these cases had some element of travel, within the last week, outside of South Dakota,” Secretary of Health Kim Malsam-Rysdon said. “The cases do not appear to be interrelated. These people are now at their homes. We are investigating who these people may have been in contact with.”

    Noem reiterated that she has not declared a state emergency.

    “This is still the influenza season. Providers know the protocols to follow. For now, a partial opening status had been declared for the state’s emergency management system. The state has enough test kits on hand with the capacity to cover 800 people. These tests are free. If you have any symptoms, call your provider first,” said Noem.

    “Our team has been preparing for weeks, and I am confident we have the right people in place to address this fluid situation. Without panicking, I encourage all South Dakotans to take this seriously – now is the time to prepare and to stay informed.”

    “I remind you to be prepared yourselves. If you have any symptoms, stay home, wash your hands often. People with pre-sustained conditions should be very careful. Common sense is the best approach. Peace of mind is very important,” Noem said. “Continue to live your lives, but be prepared and use common sense.”

    By 8 a.m. Tuesday, the specimens were at the state laboratory. By 2:15 p.m., the presumptive positive results were known. Each person tested requires at least two tests. Samples are pulled at the patient’s local laboratory, and those samples are taken to the state laboratory for confirmation. Results are still considered presumptive until the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) gives a confirmatory test.

    Noem’s public announcement came after the patients were apprised of the test results.

    “Being a rural state, maybe in some ways is to our advantage,” Noem said. “But we do have many people traveling in and out of the state this time of year. We have some big events going on and scheduled. There is constant conversation on closing things. We have a robust tele-health system. If you have symptoms, stay at home and heal.”

    Pierre Mayor Steve Harding said after the City Commission’s regular meeting on Tuesday that city officials were following Noem’s lead. “We have been in contact with the Department of Health, and sent out information to all city employees,” and it goes for “all the citizens of Pierre and of South Dakota,” Harding said: “If you are sick, stay home. Use good hygiene. Wash your hands frequently, for 20 seconds. Don’t touch your eyes. If you cough, cough into your elbow, not into your hands.”

    Harding told reporters after the meeting that the city was not canceling any meetings or events, at this point. Air passengers arriving in Pierre from Denver on the SkyWest/United flights most likely have gone through some monitoring in Denver, he said.

    “We will continue to monitor the situation,” Harding added.

    Fort Pierre Mayor Gloria Hanson was in Aberdeen, Tuesday, at a board meeting about low-cost housing and the virus was discussed, she said. “We think we live in flyover country, but it got here quicker than we thought,” said Hanson. She said the city so far is heeding what health officials say. “Use common sense. If you are not comfortable with something, don’t do it.” That goes for travel or other activities, especially for people who are vulnerable due to age or chronic conditions, Hanson said.

    “I have a granddaughter with Crohn’s disease, and her immune system is very compromised. And my husband and I are at the age where we have to be careful,” said Hanson. So far, the virus hasn’t affected city business or meetings, “but we will continue to have conversations with our staff,” Hanson said.

    Reactions throughout the state varied. For example, officials at the Rushmore Plaza Civic Center in Rapid City announced that it has not canceled any shows due to the virus.

    U.S. Sen. Mike Rounds, R-S.D., made the following statement. “The state of South Dakota has been preparing to deal with COVID-19, as has the federal government. South Dakotans should continue to take care of their health during this time. This includes washing your hands frequently, avoid touching your face, and stay home if you feel sick. Avoid close contact with large groups of people if possible. The most important things we should focus on right now are saving lives and appropriate health care needs.”

    U.S. Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., added: “As (Noem) said, the state has been preparing for this possibility for weeks, and all of the necessary steps are being taken as we learn more about these individuals, where they may have traveled, and anyone else they may have contacted. I encourage South Dakotans looking for more information about COVID-19 to visit coronavirus.gov or covid.sd.gov and be aware of any state or local updates in the coming days and weeks.”

    (Capital Journal Reporter Stephen Lee contributed to this article.)

    .


    ===========

    Tell Me What To Do, O, Fearless/Dickless/Mindless Leader!!!!
    I Need A Zero!!!!!!



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    Default Senatard ZOGbot Meatpuppets pass coronavirus ZOG bankster rescue package on unanusmouse vote

    Senatard ZOGbot Meatpuppets pass coronavirus ZOG bankster rescue package on unanusmouse vote



    https://news.yahoo.com/white-house-c...101346914.html
    http://christian-identity.net/forum/...1116#post21116
    http://whitenationalist.org/forum/sh...1116#post21116


    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate late Wednesday passed an unparalleled $2.2 trillion economic rescue package steering aid to businesses, workers and health care systems engulfed by the coronavirus pandemic.

    The unanimous vote came despite misgivings on both sides about whether it goes too far or not far enough and capped days of difficult negotiations as Washington confronted a national challenge unlike it has ever faced.

    The 880-page measure is the largest economic relief bill in U.S. history. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., appeared somber and exhausted as he announced the vote — and he released senators from Washington until April 20, though he promised to recall them if needed.

    “The legislation now before us now is historic because it is meant to match a historic crisis,"said Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y. “Our health care system is not prepared to care for the sick. Our workers are without work. Our businesses cannot do business. Our factories lie idle. The gears of the American economy have ground to a halt."

    The package is intended as relief for an economy spiraling into recession or worse and a nation facing a grim toll from an infection that's killed nearly 20,000 people worldwide. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, asked how long the aid would keep the economy afloat, said: “We’ve anticipated three months. Hopefully, we won’t need this for three months."

    Underscoring the effort's sheer magnitude, the bill finances a response with a price tag that equals half the size of the entire $4 trillion annual federal budget.

    Insistently optimistic, President Donald Trump said of the greatest public-health emergency in anyone's lifetime, "I don’t think its going to end up being such a rough patch" and anticipated the economy soaring “like a rocket ship” when it's over.

    The drive by leaders to speed the bill through the Senate was slowed as four conservative Republican senators from states who economies are dominated by low-wage jobs demanded changes, saying the legislation as written might give workers like store clerks incentives to stay on unemployment instead of returning return to their jobs since they may earn more money if they're laid off than if they're working. They settled for a failed vote to modify the provision.

    Other objections floated in from New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, who has become a prominent Democrat on the national scene as the country battles the pandemic. Cuomo, whose state has seen more deaths from the pandemic than any other, said, “I'm telling you, these numbers don't work."

    Ardent liberals like Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez were restless as well, but top Washington Democrats assured them that a additional coronavirus legislation will follow this spring and signaled that delaying the pending measure would be foolish.

    The sprawling measure is the third coronavirus response bill produced by Congress and by far the largest. It builds on efforts focused on vaccines and emergency response, sick and family medical leave for workers, and food aid.

    House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., swung behind the bipartisan agreement, saying it “takes us a long way down the road in meeting the needs of the American people."

    Senate passage delivered the legislation to the Democratic-controlled House, which will most likely pass it Friday. House members are scattered around the country and the timetable for votes in that chamber was unclear.

    House Democratic and Republican leaders have hoped to clear the measure for Trump's signature by a voice vote without having to call lawmakers back to Washington.

    The package would give direct payments to most Americans, expand unemployment benefits and provide a $367 billion program for small businesses to keep making payroll while workers are forced to stay home.

    It includes a controversial, heavily negotiated $500 billion program for guaranteed, subsidized loans to larger industries, including airlines. Hospitals would get significant help as well.

    Six days of arduous talks produced the bill, creating tensions among Congress' top leaders, who each took care to tend to party politics as they maneuvered and battled over crafting the legislation. But failure is not an option, nor is starting over, which permitted both sides to include their priorities.

    “That Washington drama does not matter any more,” McConnell said. “The Senate is going to stand together, act together, and pass this historic relief package today.”

    The bill would provide one-time direct payments to Americans of $1,200 per adult making up to $75,000 a year, and $2,400 to a married couple making up to $150,000, with $500 payments per child.

    A huge cash infusion for hospitals expecting a flood of COVID-19 patients grew during the talks to an estimated $130 billion. Another $45 billion would fund additional relief through the Federal Emergency Management Agency for local response efforts and community services.

    Democrats said the package would help replace the salaries of furloughed workers for four months, rather than the three months first proposed. Furloughed workers would get whatever amount a state usually provides for unemployment, plus a $600 per week add-on, with gig workers like Uber drivers covered for the first time.

    Businesses controlled by members of Congress and top administration officials — including Trump and his immediate family members — would be ineligible for the bill's business assistance.

    Schumer boasted of negotiating wins for transit systems, hospitals and cash-hungry state governments that were cemented after Democrats blocked the measure in votes held Sunday and Monday.

    But Cuomo said the Senate package would send less than $4 billion to New York, far short of his estimate that the crisis will cost his state up to $15 billion over the next year. More than 280 New Yorkers have died from the virus, a death toll more than double that of any other state.

    Still, Pelosi said the need for more money for New York is “no reason to stop the step we are taking.”

    Pelosi was a force behind $400 million in grants to states to expand voting by mail and other steps that Democrats billed as making voting safer but Republican critics called political opportunism. The package also contains $15.5 billion more for a surge in demand for food stamps as part of a massive $330 billion title for agency operations.

    Republicans won inclusion of an “employee retention” tax credit that's estimated to provide $50 billion to companies that retain employees on payroll and cover 50% of workers' paycheck up to $10,000. Companies would also be able to defer payment of the 6.2% Social Security payroll tax.

    A companion appropriations package ballooned as well, growing from a $46 billion White House proposal to $330 billion, which dwarfs earlier disasters — including Hurricane Katrina and Superstorm Sandy combined.

    Europe is enacting its own economic recovery packages, with huge amounts of credit guarantees, government spending and other support.

    Germany, Europe's biggest economy, has agreed to commit over 1 trillion euros ($1.1 trillion) in fiscal stimulus and support — roughly 30% of that nation's entire annual output. France, Spain and Italy have launched similar programs.

    For most people, the new coronavirus causes mild or moderate symptoms, such as fever and cough that clear up in two to three weeks. For some, especially older adults and people with existing health problems, it can cause more severe illness, including pneumonia, or death.

    In the United States, more than 55,000 people have been sickened and more than 1,000 have died.

    ___



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    Default Sorry, ZOGtard coonspiracy theorists. ZOG Study claims COVID-19 'is not a laboratory construct'

    Sorry, ZOGtard coonspiracy theorists. ZOG Study claims COVID-19 'is not a laboratory construct'

    Hey ZOGtard Asshole, Let's blow smoke up jewr ass, cum-cum, cum-cum!!!

    KATE HOLLAND
    Good Morning America
    •March 27, 2020




    https://www.yahoo.com/gma/sorry-cons...opstories.html
    http://christian-identity.net/forum/...1123#post21123
    http://whitenationalist.org/forum/sh...1123#post21123


    Conspiracy theories claiming COVID-19 was engineered in a lab as part of a biological attack on the United States have been gaining traction online in recent weeks, but a new study on the origins of the virus has concluded that the pandemic-causing strain developed naturally.

    An analysis of the evidence, according to the findings first published in the scientific journal Nature Medicine, shows that the novel coronavirus "is not a laboratory construct or a purposefully manipulated virus," with the researchers concluding "we do not believe that any type of laboratory-based scenario is plausible."

    "There’s a lot of speculation and conspiracy theories that went to a pretty high level," Dr. Robert Garry, a professor at the Tulane University School of Medicine and one of the authors of the study, told ABC News, "so we felt it was important to get a team together to examine evidence of this new coronavirus to determine what we could about the origin."

    Tune into ABC at 1 p.m. ET and ABC News Live at 4 p.m. ET every weekday for special coverage of the novel coronavirus with the full ABC News team, including the latest news, context and analysis.

    Dr. Francis Collins, the director of the National Institutes of Health, supported the study’s findings, writing on his blog, "This study leaves little room to refute a natural origin for COVID-19."

    Researchers concluded that the novel coronavirus is not a human creation because it does not share any "previously used virus backbone." It likely arose, the study said, from a recombination of a virus found in bats and another virus, possibly originating from pangolins, otherwise known as scaly anteaters.

    COVID-19 is 96% identical to a coronavirus found in bats, researchers said, but with a certain variation that could explain what has made it so infectious.

    "We know from the study of other coronaviruses that they’re able to acquire this [variation] and they can then become more pathogenic," Garry told ABC News. "This is a good explanation as to why this virus is so transmittable and has caused this pandemic."

    The mutation in surface proteins, according to Garry, could have triggered the outbreak of the pandemic, but it’s also possible that a less severe version of the illness was circulating through the population for years, perhaps even decades, before escalating to this point.

    "We don’t know if those mutations were picked up more recently or a long time ago," Garry told ABC News. "It’s impossible to say if it actually was a mutation that triggered the pandemic, but either way, it would have been a naturally occurring process."

    And while many believe the virus originated at a fish market in Wuhan, China, Garry said that is also a misconception.

    "Our analyses, and others too, point to an earlier origin than that," Garry said. "There were definitely cases there, but that wasn’t the origin of the virus."



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  5. #15
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    ZOGling whigger ass-clown is offline Smarter than D-g, Dumber than Dirt Veteran Member ZOGling whigger ass-clown has a little shameless behaviour in the past
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    Default Rural Whiggers Inundated with Fleeing ZOGling Whigger & jewboy Refugees

    Rural Whiggers Inundated with Fleeing ZOGling Whigger & jewboy Refugees

    Coronavirus sends city dwellers fleeing to second homes, inflaming tensions in towns across the nation



    https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/coro...212622496.html
    http://christian-identity.net/forum/...1126#post21126
    http://whitenationalist.org/forum/sh...1126#post21126


    Amid increasingly vitriolic Facebook posts on various community pages about how city dwellers with second homes should stay away during the coronavirus pandemic, a nurse added her post to the mix, aiming to explain why she and her husband would be coming to the Cape Cod region in Massachusetts from New York in April.

    “My husband and I are both RN’s… We are …coming to help with the influx of potentially critical patients into the Cape’s healthcare system,” she wrote. “Please keep in mind that not all your neighbors with NY or out of state license plates are there as a burden. Some may be there to help save your life if it’s needed. Let’s be kind in this time of need and help our neighbors not alienate them.”

    Even among the dozens of positive comments, including, “You shouldn’t have to explain yourself,” were a couple of snarky responses disparaging their arrival, which have since been deleted. And an influx of similar posts have touched off debates that have sometimes continued for days — “I know many second homeowners who are far from rich,” noted a resident of Provincetown, at the most remote tip of Cape Cod and currently under a local state of emergency, in an attempt to diffuse resentment. Another added, “Today a woman asked me if a was a ‘townie’? And I was honestly nervous as to how to respond.”

    Meanwhile, said one of many dissenters, “Not only should people not be flooding into town, people who live in [Provincetown] and have a place to leave to should leave to help the situation...why anyone thinks isolating on the tip of an island with limited resources is the thing to do is beyond me.”

    Enter the latest version of “Us and Them,” coronavirus edition, with anxiety over the pandemic stoking age-old tensions between locals and second-homeowners in towns across the country and the world.

    In New Jersey, Gov. Phil Murphy publicly urged folks with beach homes on the Jersey Shore to stay away from them. “The local infrastructure, especially the health care infrastructure, and especially in off-season, is not prepared for the influx of part-time residents,” he announced over the weekend. “There’s absolutely no excuse for a party at the beach. Please stay at your primary residences." Local Jersey Shore officials, including the Point Pleasant police chief and a Cape May County Freeholder expressed similar sentiments.

    Meanwhile, the Maine island of North Haven voted to immediately ban visitors and seasonal residents to help stop the spread of COVID-19, the Outer Banks of North Carolina have closed to non-residents, the mayor of the tiny Village of Ruidoso in New Mexico issued an executive order asking visitors and second homeowners to stay away and Gov. Charlie Baker of Massachusetts has urged second homeowners to nix plans to hunker down on the islands of Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyard.

    “We would prefer they not do that and that they stay on the mainland and don’t create additional issues for both of those Islands at a point in time when they don’t have the level of service capacity in place they typically would have in the summer,” he told reporters.



    Coronavirus sends city dwellers fleeing to second homes, inflaming tensions in towns across the nation

    Beth Greenfield
    Senior Editor
    Yahoo LifestyleMarch 24, 2020
    Cyclists ride their bicycles in Cape May, N.J., where some locals, fearing infection and an overwhelming of already-stretched resources, are yanking the welcome mat from city dwellers with beach houses. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)View photos
    Cyclists ride their bicycles in Cape May, N.J., where some locals, fearing infection and an overwhelming of already-stretched resources, are yanking the welcome mat from city dwellers with beach houses. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)
    More
    Amid increasingly vitriolic Facebook posts on various community pages about how city dwellers with second homes should stay away during the coronavirus pandemic, a nurse added her post to the mix, aiming to explain why she and her husband would be coming to the Cape Cod region in Massachusetts from New York in April.

    “My husband and I are both RN’s… We are …coming to help with the influx of potentially critical patients into the Cape’s healthcare system,” she wrote. “Please keep in mind that not all your neighbors with NY or out of state license plates are there as a burden. Some may be there to help save your life if it’s needed. Let’s be kind in this time of need and help our neighbors not alienate them.”



    Even among the dozens of positive comments, including, “You shouldn’t have to explain yourself,” were a couple of snarky responses disparaging their arrival, which have since been deleted. And an influx of similar posts have touched off debates that have sometimes continued for days — “I know many second homeowners who are far from rich,” noted a resident of Provincetown, at the most remote tip of Cape Cod and currently under a local state of emergency, in an attempt to diffuse resentment. Another added, “Today a woman asked me if a was a ‘townie’? And I was honestly nervous as to how to respond.”

    Meanwhile, said one of many dissenters, “Not only should people not be flooding into town, people who live in [Provincetown] and have a place to leave to should leave to help the situation...why anyone thinks isolating on the tip of an island with limited resources is the thing to do is beyond me.”

    Enter the latest version of “Us and Them,” coronavirus edition, with anxiety over the pandemic stoking age-old tensions between locals and second-homeowners in towns across the country and the world.

    In Provincetown, Mass., on the tip of Cape Cod, tensions have been flaring among locals and second homeowners amid the coronavirus outbreak. (Photo: John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images)View photos
    In Provincetown, Mass., on the tip of Cape Cod, tensions have been flaring among locals and second homeowners amid the coronavirus outbreak. (Photo: John Greim/LightRocket via Getty Images)
    More
    In New Jersey, Gov. Phil Murphy publicly urged folks with beach homes on the Jersey Shore to stay away from them. “The local infrastructure, especially the health care infrastructure, and especially in off-season, is not prepared for the influx of part-time residents,” he announced over the weekend. “There’s absolutely no excuse for a party at the beach. Please stay at your primary residences." Local Jersey Shore officials, including the Point Pleasant police chief and a Cape May County Freeholder expressed similar sentiments.

    Related Video: Cities Struggle With Social Distancing

    Meanwhile, the Maine island of North Haven voted to immediately ban visitors and seasonal residents to help stop the spread of COVID-19, the Outer Banks of North Carolina have closed to non-residents, the mayor of the tiny Village of Ruidoso in New Mexico issued an executive order asking visitors and second homeowners to stay away and Gov. Charlie Baker of Massachusetts has urged second homeowners to nix plans to hunker down on the islands of Nantucket and Martha’s Vineyard.

    “We would prefer they not do that and that they stay on the mainland and don’t create additional issues for both of those Islands at a point in time when they don’t have the level of service capacity in place they typically would have in the summer,” he told reporters.

    Todd Krause works on a boat lift in Brown's Boat Yard on March 16 on North Haven, Maine, where the Select Board voted to ban visitors and seasonal residents immediately to prevent the spread of the coronavirus to the island in Penobscot Bay. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)View photos
    Todd Krause works on a boat lift in Brown's Boat Yard on March 16 on North Haven, Maine, where the Select Board voted to ban visitors and seasonal residents immediately to prevent the spread of the coronavirus to the island in Penobscot Bay. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)
    More
    Now reports of similar pleas from officials in bucolic getaways from Cornwall, England to the remote Highlands of Scotland have also emerged.

    But what about the belief that, as one Facebook community page user stressed, “It’s not a privilege to go to a home you own — in fact it seems a privilege to feel you’re positioned to prevent a homeowner’s right to reside in their own home.”

    It’s all launched a deeply uncomfortable discussion about privilege and property taxes and insiders and outsiders, with op-eds parsing the details. One in the Asbury Park Press noted, “What I sensed from these heated Facebook discussions is that people who live at the Jersey Shore are fearful and looking to barricade themselves in. They are also looking for a scapegoat.”

    Even experts in ethics disagree on the matter.

    "Just because we have a right to do something doesn't mean it's right to do it," Bruce Weinstein, known as the Ethics Guy, tells Yahoo Lifestyle. "As of March 24, over a dozen states have asked residents to stay at home… Even if we're not legally required to stay put, there are good reasons to do so." He adds, "As the Washington Post has reported, the first confirmed case of coronavirus in Vermont was from a man who left his home in New York to go to his vacation home there. The Post also quoted a Nantucket hospital that cannot handle a mass evacuation from New York."

    Weinstein concludes, "If ever there were a time to stop thinking solely about ourselves and include the well-being of others into our decision making, that time is now. The ethically intelligent thing to do is for all of us to stay put and avoid overtaxing systems like the health care facilities in small vacation towns."

    However Margaret P. Battin — a professor of philosophy at the University of Utah’s Medical Ethics program and editor of the 2006 academic publication Ethics Infectious Disease — is not so sure.

    “The underlying wariness of outsiders — who typically have more money and more mobility than the local folk, whether farmers or fishermen — can become underlying resentment,” she tells Yahoo Lifestyle. Adding coronavirus fears on top of that — “you might come buy our supplies and infect us with this disease that only you have” — can create a toxic brew.

    Battin suggests trying to think logically through each point of worry. “The assumption is it’s these outsiders who would bring disease,” she says. “But I don’t know, in contact tracing, if that’s how transmission actually works.”

    As for the frequently-held belief that second homeowners are “taxing the system,” she says, “It’s true that if you got ill, you might tax whatever medical facilities there are — and of course you’ll pay for them through your insurance. On the other hand, these second-home folks are often the ones who have contributed the most to local economies; they bring quite a lot of affluence into the community and into the community’s tax base.”

    Battin noted that the way we’re all encouraged to think about transmission is that everyone is responsible for protecting themselves. “So, you’re supposed to wash your hands, stay six feet away from others, not congregate. The onus is on you to do two things: not spread it and not receive it. If people come to your remote county, they’re not more likely to spread the virus than any other people, and they are expected to be as restrained as the local folk are.”

    So, the question, then, shouldn’t necessarily be, “Is it wrong to go there?” but rather, “Are there things you shouldn’t do when you go there and are they different than things you shouldn’t do when you’re in the city?”

    “It seems to me that saying it’s wrong to go there is making at least two assumptions: one, that your economic impact there would be negative, and second, that you would be likely to spread the virus while you’re there,” Battin says. But those are assumptions that, as she points out, aren’t necessarily true.

    Finally, Battin stresses something similar to what was announced on Facebook by Provincetown’s Select Board member Lise King, and picked up in the New York Times: “TO ANYONE THINKING ABOUT COMING TO PTOWN: PLEASE make yourself aware of our circumstances and make an informed choice. If you come here and fall ill you are taking a risk that we won’t have the capacity to help you,” she said.

    “The person who goes to remote places has to remember they are increasing risks to themselves, in a way,” Battin says, noting that, while she has a cabin in a remote rural area of Utah, she’s decided to stay put in Salt Lake City, where she’s “7 minutes away from a top-flight hospital… So it’s not as though I’m only imposing risks on them, but assuming them myself, as well. We don’t always think about the other side of the argument.”






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    Default Dirty niggers & beaners dying like Dirty niggers & beaners in Dirty nigger & beaner Shitholes

    Dirty niggers & beaners dying like Dirty niggers & beaners in Dirty nigger & beaner Shitholes


    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/08/n...ce-deaths.html
    http://christian-identity.net/forum/...1178#post21178
    http://whitenationalist.org/forum/sh...1178#post21178


    WNN - jew yawk Shitty The coronavirus is killing black and Latino people in New York City at twice the rate that it is killing white people, according to preliminary data released on Wednesday by the city.

    The disparity reflected longstanding and persistent economic inequalities and differences in access to health care, Mayor Bill de Blasio said on Wednesday morning.

    “There are clear inequalities, clear disparities in how this disease is affecting the people of our city,” Mr. de Blasio said. “The truth is that in so many ways the negative effects of coronavirus — the pain it’s causing, the death it’s causing — tracks with other profound health care disparities that we have seen for years and decades.”

    The preliminary death rate for Hispanic people in the city is about 22 people per 100,000; the rate for black people is 20 per 100,000; the rate for white people is 10 per 100,000; and the rate for Asian people is 8 per 100,000. The rates are adjusted for the size and age of the population.

    Another 779 people in New York State died of the virus, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo reported on Wednesday, the second straight day that deaths spiked to new highs — even as the mayor acknowledged that the death toll may be higher than the reported figures.

    Mr. de Blasio said on Wednesday that there are “100 to 200 people per day” in the city who die at home and are presumed to be virus victims but who are not tested and are left out of the virus death toll.

    “This used to be a very, very rare thing in New York City,” the mayor said of people dying at home. “Obviously it’s jumped up, and the only thing that’s changed is Covid-19.”

    There was also a glimmer of hope in the state’s hospitalization figures on Wednesday: The number of virus patients in hospitals had increased by 3 percent since Tuesday, the fifth consecutive day that number had increased by less than 10 percent — suggesting that the curve of infection may be flattening.

    Mr. de Blasio swept into office in 2013 on a wave of rhetoric about how New York had become a bastion of inequality. Over the last six years of his administration, the mayor has set out to repair that imbalance with universal prekindergarten, increases in the minimum wage for city workers and paid sick leave.

    The coronavirus outbreak has now illuminated other gaps between the haves and have-nots in New York City, from the availability of testing sites to the availability of beds and personal protection equipment at hospitals.

    In New York City, Latinos represent 34 percent of the people who have died of the coronavirus but make up 29 percent of the city’s population, according to preliminary data from the city’s Health Department. Black people represent 28 percent of deaths but make up 22 percent of the population.

    New York City’s racial disparity in deaths is similar to that in other parts of the state, but is actually less pronounced than in other states and cities that have released racial breakdowns of coronavirus cases and deaths.

    In Chicago, for example, black people account for 72 percent of virus-related fatalities, even though they make up a little less than a third of the population.

    Mr. Cuomo said on Wednesday that some of the difference could be attributed to poorer people having more untreated chronic health problems than more-affluent individuals, making them more likely to die if they contract the virus.

    But he said that black and Hispanic people may also be disproportionately represented on the front lines of workers who are at high risk.

    “Are more public workers Latino and African-American?” the governor asked. “Who don’t have a choice, frankly, but to go out there every day and drive the bus and drive the train and show up for work and wind up subjecting themselves to, in this case, the virus. Whereas many other people who had the option just absented themselves.”

    Mr. Cuomo committed on Wednesday to more testing in minority and low-income communities and a study to find out why the disparities exist.

    A study from Scott M. Stringer, the city comptroller, found that 75 percent of front-line workers in the city — grocery clerks, bus and train operators, janitors and child care staff — are minorities. More than 60 percent of people who work as cleaners are Latino, and more than 40 percent of transit employees are black.

    If New York City is the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak in the country, minorities and people in the city’s poorest neighborhoods reside at the core.

    Data from the Health Department shows that emergency room visits for flulike symptoms have surged in neighborhoods where the typical household income is less than the city’s median of $60,000, according to an analysis of data by The New York Times. All but one of the top 20 neighborhoods with the lowest percentages of positive tests are in wealthy ZIP codes.

    “We are watching, in real time, racial disparities and the pandemic of poverty,” said Michael Blake, an assemblyman from the Bronx whose district overlaps with one of the poorest congressional districts in the country.

    Mr. Blake and other elected officials have called on the governor and mayor to set up more rapid testing sites in places like the South Bronx and southeast Queens, as well as a field hospital and temporary housing for medical and military personnel.

    Mr. de Blasio and Dr. Oxiris Barbot, the city’s health commissioner, stressed that members of the city’s Hispanic community might have been discouraged from seeking health care because of the anti-immigrant rhetoric that has dominated the national discourse in recent years.

    “The overlay of the anti-immigrant rhetoric across this country, I think, has real implications in the health of our community,” Dr. Barbot said Wednesday.

    Mr. de Blasio said the city would increase its efforts to make sure the city’s public hospitals, where many poor and uninsured people go for treatment, have all the resources they need, including ventilators and personal protective equipment. The city will also make it easier for people calling 311 to speak to a health care worker in their language about the virus.

    “This is about the most essential concept of ensuring that everyone gets health care regardless of their background, regardless of their ZIP code, regardless of their income,” Mr. de Blasio said.

    The mayor had said on Tuesday that providing ethnicity data was less of a focus in a “crisis atmosphere.”

    But Eric Adams, the Brooklyn borough president, said that not releasing the data had caused mistrust in minority communities. “There has been an outer-borough response to Covid-19 and a Manhattan response,” he said. “The allocation of resources should go to the area of higher needs.”

    Malo Hutson, an associate professor at the Columbia University Graduate School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation and director of the school’s Urban Community and Health Equity Lab, said that the mayor’s challenge to lessen the inequities exposed by the outbreak was daunting.

    “It’s one thing to raise the issue and say there are a disproportionate amount of blacks and low-income people who become infected with coronavirus,” Professor Hutson said. “It’s another to turn this into policy.”

    .

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  7. #17
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    Default I'll open up the ZOGland when I feels like it, cum-cum, cum-cum!!!

    I'll open up the ZOGland when I feels like it, cum-cum, cum-cum!!!



    https://gab.com/ZOG-Emperor-Drumpf/p...93103216500647
    http://christian-identity.net/forum/...1197#post21197
    http://whitenationalist.org/forum/sh...1197#post21197


    For the purpose of creating coonflict and coonfusion, some in the Fake News Media are saying that it is the Governors decision to open up the states, not that of the President of the United States & the Federal Government. Let it be foolly understood that this is incorrect....

    ... It is the decision of me the ZOG-Emperor Drumpf, and for many good reasons. The very same reason a dog licks its nuts . . . because it can, cum-cum, cum-cum!!! Or so Ivanka said while giving me a fatherly lap-dance while that doofus jewrod was yapping some stupid shit about how since the impeachment bullet missed me by a mile I can do whatever I want. With that being said, the Administration and I are working closely with the Governors, and this will continue. Nipples Coumo will fall in line because the Cornholio-Boomer-Remover virus really affects niggers & beaners & jews before it touches whiggers. A decision by me, in coonjunction with the Governors and input from others, especially Daddy's little squirrel Ivanka and that kike doofus jewrod, will be made shortly! Pathetic !!!

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    I'll get Banned on Twatter, cum-cum, cum-cum!!!



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    Default Bitch McCoonnell tells Blue-jew States to drop dead

    Bitch McCoonnell tells Blue-jew States to drop dead

    McConnell Says States Should Consider Bankruptcy, Rebuffing Calls for Aid

    The majority leader’s comments drew a strong rebuke from Gov. Andrew 'Nipples' Cuomo.



    https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/22/u...ankruptcy.html
    http://christian-identity.net/forum/...1233#post21233
    http://whitenationalist.org/forum/sh...1233#post21233



    (WNN) WASHINGTON — Senator Mitch McConnell took a hard line on Wednesday against giving cash-short states more federal aid in future emergency pandemic relief legislation, saying that those suffering steep shortfalls amid the coronavirus crisis should instead consider bankruptcy.

    “I think this whole business of additional assistance for state and local governments needs to be thoroughly evaluated,” Mr. McConnell, Republican of Kentucky and the majority leader, said in an interview with the conservative radio host Hugh Hewitt. “There’s not going to be any desire on the Republican side to bail out state pensions by borrowing money from future generations.”

    Mr. McConnell’s comments were an explicit rejection of a top priority of Democrats who have pushed to spend tens of billions of dollars to help states. His staff members highlighted their partisan cast in a news release circulated a short time later, in which his statement appeared under the heading “Stopping Blue State Bailouts.” The phrase suggested that the top Senate Republican was singling out for scorn some of the hardest-hit, heavily Democratic states such as California, Illinois and New York.

    The remarks drew a caustic reaction from Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo of New York, who called the bankruptcy suggestion “one of the saddest, really dumb comments of all time.”

    “OK, let’s have all the states declare bankruptcy — that’s the way to bring the national economy back,” he said.

    Mr. Cuomo accused Mr. McConnell of hyperpartisanship, criticizing him for distinguishing among states based on their political leanings, rather than “states where people are dying. Why don’t we think about that? Not red and blue. Red, white and blue. They’re just Americans dying.”

    Representative Peter T. King of New York, a fellow Republican, called Mr. McConnell’s remarks “shameful and indefensible.” “To say that it is ‘free money’ to provide funds for cops, firefighters and healthcare workers makes McConnell the Marie Antoinette of the Senate,” Mr. King said on Twitter on Wednesday night.

    States do not now have the ability to declare bankruptcy to reduce their financial obligations, but Mr. McConnell raised the possibility of letting them do so rather than pouring federal money into rescuing them, which would push the federal government deeper into debt.

    “I would certainly be in favor of allowing states to use the bankruptcy route,” he said. “It saves some cities. And there’s no good reason for it not to be available.”

    The Democratic push for more federal aid to states and cities contending with a budget crunch because of the pandemic was a major sticking point in the latest round of legislation to respond to the outbreak, slated to clear Congress on Thursday, with Senate Republicans refusing to budge on the issue in negotiations.

    Mr. McConnell had already made it clear on Tuesday that he would approach the next round of emergency funding much more cautiously. He went further in his comments on Wednesday, saying that he did not want Washington rescuing the pension plans of states that were struggling to keep up with their commitments to an array of union workers.

    “We’ll certainly insist that anything we’d borrow to send down to the states is not spent on solving problems that they created for themselves over the years with their pension programs,” he said.

    Mr. McConnell is likely to run into considerable resistance to his position from the White House, congressional Democrats, governors of both parties and even some lawmakers in his own party.

    After the Senate vote Tuesday, top Democrats said that President Trump was open to the idea of helping states with their pension issues and that Mr. McConnell had been the chief obstacle to getting money for local governments this time around.

    In a pair of Twitter posts on Tuesday, Mr. Trump said that after he signed the latest round of emergency pandemic legislation, he was ready to open discussions on help for “State/Local Governments for lost revenues from COVID 19, much needed Infrastructure Investments for Bridges, Tunnels, Broadband, Tax Incentives for Restaurants, Entertainment, Sports, and Payroll Tax Cuts to increase Economic Growth.”

    Democrats were also confident that Congress would move forward with more relief for states, with Democratic leaders of the House and Senate promising a robust program. Several Republican lawmakers have introduced or signed on to proposals to provide huge sums to struggling states.

    In his rebuke to Mr. McConnell, Mr. Cuomo said the most recent round of coronavirus relief was woefully inadequate, complaining that the lack of money for states was ridiculous.

    “They funded small businesses,” he said. “Great, good move. How about police? How about fire? How about teachers? How about schools?”

    Mr. McConnell is a longtime rival of the labor movement and will be in no hurry to move forward with anything resembling pension relief for what he considers overly generous benefits that states mistakenly provided.

    “We all have governors regardless of party who would love to have free money,” he said.



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  10. #20
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